Keeping Easter Eggs Safe!

Now that Easter is upon us, here are some tips to keep those Easter Eggs safe to eat and enjoy –

* Wash your hands thoroughly with hot soapy water and rinse them before handling the eggs when cooking, cooling, dyeing and hiding them.
* Inspect the eggs well before purchasing them, making sure they are not dirty or cracked. Dangerous bacteria may enter a cracked egg.
* Remember to avoid cross-contamination by keeping kitchen surfaces and equipment clean and using separate knifes and cutting boards for different foods.
* Store eggs in their original cartons in the refrigerator rather than the refrigerator door.
* If you’re having an Easter egg hunt, consider hiding places carefully.
* As long as the eggs are NOT out of refrigeration over two hours, they will be safe to eat. Do not eat eggs that have been out of refrigeration more than two hours.
* Refrigerate hard-cooked eggs in their shells and use them within 1 week.
* Use only food-safe dyes on Easter eggs.
* If you are planning to use colored eggs as decorations, where the eggs will be out of refrigeration for many hours or several days, discard them after they have served their decorative purpose.

And most of all, have a safe and happy Easter!

(image: Google)

Advertisements

Bad eggs likely cause of Vic outbreak

A bad batch of eggs is being blamed for a food poisoning outbreak at a Melbourne cafe that affected 25 customers.

The salmonella outbreak occurred at the Food Republic cafe in Blackburn on March 18 after the Department of Health and Human Services linked a number of sick people to the cafe.
DHHS spokesman Bram Alexander said the department could not confirm eggs were the culprit as swabs and food samples have since shown no traces of salmonella in the cafe.
“We are not ruling any food in or any food out” Mr Alexander told AAP.
Food Republic co-owner Vanessa Lekkas says she believes the cause of the food poisoning outbreak was from a “bad batch” of eggs they whipped into raw products such as mayonnaise.  

To read the full article click the link –

http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/bad-eggs-likely-cause-of-vic-outbreak/news-story/1bf9b90d93bc60776b3d1eb8abcb36b3

 

Food Safety In An Emergency

As our northern cousins in Queensland are being battered by the aggressive Cyclone Debbie it is timely to discuss the importance of Food Safety In An Emergency.  Once the cyclone has died down (literally) and business as usual returns, people still need to eat.  Do you know what to keep and what to throw away?  Here is an important guide released by Food Standards Australia New Zealand.

There are a few things to remember before, during and after and emergency to keep your food safe

Before

  • Have a supply of long-life items including milk, bottled water and canned goods.
  • Prepare eskies with ice bricks or gel packs to keep food cold if the power goes out.
  • Keep a can opener handy.
  • Don’t forget about food for infants or pets.
  • Store food somewhere above floodwater if there’s a risk of flooding.
  • Have a supply of drinking-quality water, detergent, bleach and alcohol-based hand sanitiser.

During

  • Keep food cold, clean and check the label.
  • Keep the fridge door closed as much as possible.
  • A fridge should keep food cold for around four hours – after that it can begin to spoil.
  • Keep the freezer door closed as much as possible.
  • A freezer shouldn’t defrost for around 24 hours.
  • If frozen foods have thawed don’t refreeze!

After

  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitiser to wash hands if drinking water is limited.
  • Throw out food that has touched flood water or has an unusual smell, colour or texture. Don’t taste it to see if it’s OK.
  • Check canned foods and throw out any cans that are dented, swollen, damaged or leaking.
  • Throw out food that has been near fire, including food in cans and jars even if they appear OK.

If in doubt, throw it out!

 

 

Chefs with International Qualifications

FAQ – If I have an overseas qualification as a chef, am I able to work as a Food Safety Supervisor in Australia?

Staff at CFT International are often asked this question.   Your employer may accept your international qualifications as a chef. However, you cannot be the food safety supervisor for the business unless you have a Statement of Attainment from an RTO in Australia for the food sector in which you are working or intend to work.

International chefs can obtain a Statement of Attainment from CFT International.  CFT International is an RTO offering training for Food Safety Supervisors online, in class and by correspondence.  To find out more visit our website http://www.cft.com.au.

Salmonella outbreak in Canberra closes two cafes

An outbreak of salmonella has forced two popular Canberra cafes to close their doors while they were investigated by health inspectors.

In a statement, HPS said health inspectors had uncovered problems “related with food handling processes and procedures” at both stores.

“The cafes will be closed until such time as the identified issues have been rectified,” the statement said.

The closure of the cafes for ‘serious food safety breaches’ and “risk to public health” is a scary reminder of the extreme importance of ensuring all food handlers are properly trained and aware of best safe food handling practises.
Click the link to read the articles about the closure of two cafes in Canberra.  If you haven’t updated your Food Safety Training don’t leave it too late!

Tips for Reducing the Risk of Bad Bugs in your Food

A recent salmonella outbreak linked to prepackaged lettuce from a farm in Victoria has left 62 people sick, with worries more might be coming forward.

There are reports the outbreak might also be linked to illness in Queensland and South Australia. Authorities across the country have recalled products with best before dates leading up to and including 14 February.

How can we help to protect ourselves ? –
Using whole, unprocessed vegetables and washing them thoroughly will reduce the risk of poisoning.

Good food handling practises will too. These include washing and drying hands thoroughly before food preparation, appropriate storage of foods, and separation of raw foods (particularly meat) from foods that have already been cooked or don’t require cooking.

Consumers may choose to rewash bagged leaves.

Here is the link to read more –
http://www.sbs.com.au/…/salmonella-your-salad-cost-convenie…

Photograph Joern Pollex/Getty Images.

Foodborne illness declines in Australia

Foodborne illness declines in Australia

By Joe Whitworth+, 23-Oct-2014

Foodborne illness has declined 17% overall in Australia but the number of Salmonella and Campylobacter cases has risen.

Click the link below to read more from http://www.foodqualitynews.com

http://www.foodqualitynews.com/R-D/Salmonella-and-Campylobacter-rates-up

Are we sending our kids to school with lunch boxes crammed with sugar?

It’s back to school this week! … are parents sending their kids along with lunch boxes filled with sugar?

Channel 9 News reported that many children will return to school with lunch boxes crammed with snacks containing up to 12 teaspoons of sugar! for tips and ideas on how to beat the sugary lunch box, click the link below to see the full report –

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/other/school-lunchboxes-filled-with-sugar/vp-AAmoSYe

Are your school canteen workers properly trained to be providing food to children?

Food safety in school canteens is essential, particularly as children can be more vulnerable to food borne illness. It is recommended best practise to ensure that at least 1 staff member or parent managing your school canteen has had adequate Food Safety Training.

CFT International specialises in accredited Food Safety Training that will meet your duty-of-care obligations. We deliver high quality training with face-to-face, online or correspondence training options.

A Food Safety Supervisor needs 2 units of competence:
SITXFSA001 – Use hygienic practices for food safety and
SITXFSA002 – Participate in safe food handling practices

Please give us a call on 1300 665 633 or email support@cft.com.au to discuss how we can assist you with your training.

 

Avoiding Food Poisoning at Summer Picnics

Summer is here and the heat is on!

So too is the added risk of food poisoning which is unsurprisingly more common in summer months. Here are some great tips to help you avoid food poisoning from summer picnics.

http://www.sbs.com.au/food/article/2017/01/06/how-avoid-food-poisoning-summer-picnics