Keeping Easter Eggs Safe!

Now that Easter is upon us, here are some tips to keep those Easter Eggs safe to eat and enjoy –

* Wash your hands thoroughly with hot soapy water and rinse them before handling the eggs when cooking, cooling, dyeing and hiding them.
* Inspect the eggs well before purchasing them, making sure they are not dirty or cracked. Dangerous bacteria may enter a cracked egg.
* Remember to avoid cross-contamination by keeping kitchen surfaces and equipment clean and using separate knifes and cutting boards for different foods.
* Store eggs in their original cartons in the refrigerator rather than the refrigerator door.
* If you’re having an Easter egg hunt, consider hiding places carefully.
* As long as the eggs are NOT out of refrigeration over two hours, they will be safe to eat. Do not eat eggs that have been out of refrigeration more than two hours.
* Refrigerate hard-cooked eggs in their shells and use them within 1 week.
* Use only food-safe dyes on Easter eggs.
* If you are planning to use colored eggs as decorations, where the eggs will be out of refrigeration for many hours or several days, discard them after they have served their decorative purpose.

And most of all, have a safe and happy Easter!

(image: Google)

Advertisements

Bad eggs likely cause of Vic outbreak

A bad batch of eggs is being blamed for a food poisoning outbreak at a Melbourne cafe that affected 25 customers.

The salmonella outbreak occurred at the Food Republic cafe in Blackburn on March 18 after the Department of Health and Human Services linked a number of sick people to the cafe.
DHHS spokesman Bram Alexander said the department could not confirm eggs were the culprit as swabs and food samples have since shown no traces of salmonella in the cafe.
“We are not ruling any food in or any food out” Mr Alexander told AAP.
Food Republic co-owner Vanessa Lekkas says she believes the cause of the food poisoning outbreak was from a “bad batch” of eggs they whipped into raw products such as mayonnaise.  

To read the full article click the link –

http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/bad-eggs-likely-cause-of-vic-outbreak/news-story/1bf9b90d93bc60776b3d1eb8abcb36b3

 

Experts warn increasing number of Australians at risk from food poisoning:

Experts warn increasing number of Australians at risk from food poisoning: 

Food poisoning results, on average, in 120 deaths, 1.2 million visits to doctors, 300,000 prescriptions for antibiotics, and 2.1 million days of lost work each year. The estimated annual cost of food poisoning in Australia is $1.25 billion.

The number of vulnerable Australians at most risk from food poisoning is increasing, according to Australian Bureau of Statistics’ data.

In the 20 years to 30 June 2012,In 2012 people aged 65 years and over made up 14% of Australia’s population. This is projected to increase to 22% in 2061 and to 25% in 2101.
There were 420,300 people aged 85 years and over in Australia in 2012, making up 2% of the population. This group is projected to grow rapidly throughout the projection period, to 5% by 2061 and to 6% by 2101.

This increases the likelihood that either we may be in the vulnerable group ourselves or we may be preparing food for someone who is. In either case we must be extra cautious with our choice of foods and how we handle foods to avoid food poisoning.

Australians covered by these statistics are particularly vulnerable to food poisoning for valid scientific reasons including:

  • No matter how fit and healthy, those older than mid-60s have less resistance to food poisoning bacteria.
  • People suffering an illness or undergoing medical treatment, such as chemotherapy, are likely to have compromised immune systems putting them at particular risk from food poisoning.
  • Young children do not have fully developed immune systems until around 8 years of age.
  • Pregnant women have reduced immune systems and their unborn babies are at particular risk of Listeria infection.

Compulsory Food Safety Training for the Aged Care Sector.

The Community Services & Health Industry Skills Council who manage and regulate the national qualifications to support ongoing skill development within the community services and health industries.

Unit codes for Food Safety Supervisors and staff handling food are:

HLTFS207C – Follow Basic Food Safety Practices

HLTFS310C – Apply and monitor Food Safety Requirements and

HLT309C – Oversee the Day-to- Day Implementation of Food Safety in the Workplace

Training is available online

  • Your admin staff can track your groups progress
  • You can train at your own pace, in your own time, 24/7!
  • Enroll and begin training immediately
  • No need to travel to find a class
  • Train anytime, anywhere
  • Flexible, self-paced learning online with a workplace assessment of skills
  • Qualified trainer support available online 365 days per year

For classes go to http://www.cft.com.au to see all available pubic access classes or we would be happy to come to your workplace and train your staff.

Food Safety re-fresher training is also available if your staff already hold a valid qualification but need to update their skills or update to these new unit codes.

Listeria outbreak prompts cheese recall – The Age

Image

A listeria outbreak has prompted a nation-wide recall of certain brands of soft cheeses.

Eight cases of listeria infection across Australia have found to be linked and a further three cases are under investigation, Victoria’s Department of Health said.

The state’s chief health officer Rosemary Lester said consumers should discard 1kg brie and camembert cheese branded Jindi, the 1kg Wattle Valley double brie and the 1kg Wattle Valley camembert with a best before date of December 21.

Dr Lester warned consumers to check the best before date of any Jindi or Wattle Valley soft cheeses.

“Consumers who have purchased a cut portion of camembert or brie from a supermarket or delicatessen who are unsure of the brand should discard it,” she said.

Two Victorians, three NSW residents and one person in Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia have been diagnosed with the infection.

The cheeses have been voluntarily recalled as a precaution.

Listeria infections usually only produce mild symptoms in healthy people, but can be dangerous to pregnant women, their unborn babies and elderly people, Dr Lester said.

“It can cause miscarriages in pregnant women and even death in people with compromised immune systems,” Dr Lester said.

“Investigations into listeria are complex as it can be difficult to identify the source.

“Symptoms of illness can take up to 70 days to appear.”

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/national/listeria-outbreak-prompts-cheese-recall-20121218-2bky2.html#ixzz2FXQ4rsjW

December 18th 2012